LFW HIGHLIGHTS: PART TWO

 With a star studded front row, Julien Macdonald took to the Royal Opera House to put on a show of glitz and glamour with skin-tight crochet dresses, ruffled swimsuits, floral pencil skirts and enough crystals and feathers to rival the Strictly Come Dancing wardrobe department.

 Another designer to embrace the seventies trend for next season was the fantastic Matthew Williamson. Models bounced down the runway with Farrah Fawcett tresses, clad in Studio 54 maxi dresses, and floral appliqué in Williamson’s exotic hues and signature prints.

 The city was treated to a touch of Hollywood this week as American brand (but British designers) , Marchesa made a one-off appearance on the schedule to celebrate their ten-year anniversary. Taking a more rock and roll approach to the seventies trend, designer duo, Georgina Chapman and Keren Craig showcased lace trousers, bohemian guipere dresses and tiered gypsy dresses adorned with beautiful antique-style florals.

 Breaking away from the seventies trend was Marios Schwab who bought a breath of fresh tailoring to the catwalk. Muted blues and beiges opened the show in a collection of simplistic silhouettes and separates, cropped trench coats and asymmetric hemlines. As events unfolded, the collection developed into watercolour prints, origami folds and dashes of turquoise and orange, adding a beautiful modernity.

 Bringing some carefree fun to the weeks event was Markus Lupfer, who debuted a collection worthy of the laidback surfers of California. Wetsuit detailing was bought to co-ords, cute minidresses and wrap-around skirts in a plethora of clashing prints and psychedelic swirls. All finished off with the jelly shoes of our youth. Perfection.

 Also flying the flag for youthful rebellion was Lulu & Co. It was Lulu Kennedy’s first venture into LFW with her own collection and it was everything you’d expect from the fashion mentor. “Freedom, fun and love” were the inspirations behind her energetic collection. which included denim cut-offs, holographic appliqué and reflective high-vis tops that Kennedy’s has adopted as a signature style.

Last but by no means least is JW Anderson. As the creative director at luxury leather goods brand, Loewe, it’s no surprise that the material featured heavily in his solo collection. Floppy fisherman hats framed the models faces as they sauntered down the catwalk in cropped jackets, leather crop tops and densely knitted dresses. With a moody colour palette to begin with, Anderson lightened the mood with flashes of oversized red collars and a head-to-toe blush pink ensemble to finish.

 Images: Vogue.com
 
Follow:
Share: